Roots and Causes of the Current Economic Crisis

The world financial crisis of 2007-2009 is compared to the Great Depression. Starting in the US, the crisis rapidly spread all over the world, leading to the growth of unemployment and inflation, collapse of small and medium businesses and other serious problems. The neutralization of crisis effects still remains one of the priority tasks in world countries along with the restoration of the economics.

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Gold Standard

What is a gold standard?

Before attempting to define the Gold Standard, it would be probably more important to look at the circumstances and conditions that led to, and enhanced this kind of monetary system. As trade became clear for nations, within and outside national economies, there was need for a standard monetary system to govern exchange. The gold standard is one of these systems, in which gold was used as a backing for money in circulation. In the gold standard system, money that is printed reflects the gold reserve of the country’s central bank. Of course, there could be other backing like silver, but gold was adopted for the superior characteristics it has over the others (Flandreau & Eichengreen 80).

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Women’s Work and Economic Development

The purpose of this paper is to examine changes in women’s labor force status with economic development as discussed by Mammen and Paxson. In particular, the paper focuses on a simple textbook model of how women’s labor supply and type of work change at different stages of economic development. In addition, the cross-country data, along with the case study data on two developing countries are examined to see if the results are consistent with the model. The paper then argues that there is a need to measure women’s societal status via examining levels of gender discrimination and inequality in resource allocation to have a better understanding of women’s work status in the poor countries. Finally, the paper aims to explain the importance of women’s labor force status in determining why rich countries are rich and poor countries are poor.

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Globalization in Economics and its Consequences

Globalization refers to the process through which different regional economies, societies and cultures all over the world combine and operate as though they were a single unit (Mutia 13). Economic Globalization is a term which describes the process of integration of individual, national economies into the world economy by allowing free movement of both goods and services, and the factors of production (labor, capital, and technical knowhow) across borders. Through globalization, financial and investment markets effectively transact globally because there is better communication platform and there is no unnecessary regulation (Haggblade 2).  This paper explores the positive and negative consequences of economic globalization.

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Essay on Sustainable Emerging Market Economies

A handful of countries in Central Europe, Latin America, and Asia have experienced rapid economic growth throughout most of the past decade. Because this fast growth presents significant marketing opportunities, the countries are known as emerging markets. Ten countries generally recognized as emerging markets are China, India, Indonesia, South Korea, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, South Africa, Poland, and Turkey. Despite contrasts between developed countries and emerging countries, experts predict that the emerging markets will be key players in global trade even as their track records on human rights, environmental protection, and other issues come under closer scrutiny by their trading partners.

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Essay on Economic Crisis

In 1998, the economic crisis affected greatly all Asian countries, their economic and social spheres unveiling political discrepancies and economic weaknesses. The reason is that different reformers in Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand choose different approaches to recovery and liberalization. Whether economic liberalization precedes or succeeds a downturn in economic cycles, liberalization has profound political ramifications since it indicates the state’s willingness to ‘roll back’ some of its functions and transfer economic decision-making and power to market forces and social actors with the potential to empower civil society.

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